Voice Service Providers FCC in SHAKEN/STIR Implementation

Voice Service Providers FCC in SHAKEN/STIR Implementation

February 22, 2020 Off By administrator

Comments were due on January 29 on the Public Notice soliciting input for the FCC’s first staff report on call blocking, covered in last month’s TCPA Digest. The FCC received numerous comments in this proceeding, including from large voice service providers, smaller rural voice service providers, calling parties, technology platforms, and consumer groups. Large voice service providers generally shared the tools they have made available to consumers to fight unwanted robocalls, explained that measuring the effectiveness of robocall mitigation will be challenging, supported the FCC’s efforts to enact the TRACED Act, and encouraged the FCC to adopt a broad safe harbor for call blocking that is based on reasonable analytics. Small and rural voice service providers generally explained that the SHAKEN/STIR framework, in its current form, is unlikely to be adopted in rural areas, and discussed other issues, such as IP interconnection challenges, that will delay its adoption. On the other hand, calling parties highlighted that mislabeled and incorrectly blocked calls are inhibiting their ability to do business and that the FCC should require voice service providers to give callers notice of labeled and blocked calls and implement a challenge mechanism to enable callers to unblock calls. Technology platform providers asked the FCC to provide clarity on the meaning of reasonable analytics, supported the adoption of a broad safe harbor, and noted that call-blocking solutions are often not “one size fits all.” The coalition of consumer groups that submitted comments asked the FCC to implement transparent metrics and collect additional information from voice service providers.

A number of large and small voice service providers also wrote to the FCC’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau to update staff on their progress deploying and implementing SHAKEN/STIR, reasonable analytics, and other parts of the robocall blocking toolkit. Large voice service providers generally explained that they had successfully implemented SHAKEN/STIR on their networks and were already in the process of exchanging signed traffic with other providers. Voice service providers are working to increase the percentage of exchanged traffic that is signed, as well as increasing the number of partners with whom they can exchange authenticated traffic. Many noted that the potential of SHAKEN/STIR is limited by the fact that many voice service providers have not yet implemented it. Indeed, the voice service providers complicit in originating illegal robocall traffic have…

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